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Are you complying with the Working at Height Regulations 2005? Read the Essential Guidelines

November 9th, 2018 No comments

Are you complying with the Working at Height Regulations 2005? Read the Essential Guidelines

Health & Safety Executive (HSE) have stated that working at height is the leading cause of death and serious injury in the construction industry.  Did you know that it is responsible for 28% of fatal injuries in working environments? This is due to both the risk of falling, and objects being dropped from above. With this in mind, it is essential for any person employed in construction to have a thorough understanding of the Working at Height Regulations 2005.

What are the Work at Height Regulations?

These regulations set out a list of rules that should be followed in order to avoid injury. The rules are mandatory for employers or those in charge of working at height, and can be enforced by law. Whether there is a risk of falling from a ladder, from the edge of a structure, or through an opening at ground level, the rules always apply.

How do you comply with the Regulations?

A basic understanding of hierarchy within the regulations is a good place to start. Here’s the hierarchy of control measures explained:

  • Firstly, you should try to avoid any work at height if at all possible. This could be achieved by using extended tools rather than ladders, or by lowering items to ground level before carrying out repairs.
  • When working at height is unavoidable, you are required to do everything possible to eliminate the risks to employees. This could involve working from a balcony, or providing machinery with guards/rails (e.g. PASMA Mobile Access Tower)
  • When risks cannot be avoided, you will need to minimise the distance and consequences of a fall. In order to do this you would need to research options such as netting, airbags, harnesses and Personal Protective Equipment.

What should I do next?

  1. Undertake a risk assessment

Ensure you have identified any hazards and the employees at risk. Based on this, you will need to put in place suitable precautions. Be aware that you are required to record your findings if you have five or more employees.

  1. Ensure your staff are competent

Are the staff working at height experienced? Do they have the necessary skills and knowledge to perform the task safely? The level of competence depends upon the complexity of the job. To understand more about this, read the HSE guide to competence.

Some jobs may only require basic training, such as guidance from a senior employee. Technical tasks will require a higher degree of training, such as completing a course on the safe use of ladders/working at height.

Any staff involved in assembling, dismantling, inspecting or moving mobile access towers should complete a PASMA training course, such as the PASMA Tower for Users Course.

  1. Equip your employees with appropriate safety tools

You are required to provide proper safety equipment for your staff. Each task is different, and you’ll need to make sure that you choose the best option for the job. A guardrail or mobile access tower would be one of the safest measures. However, sometimes this may not be feasible and you would then need to use PPE, such as safety harnesses.

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain equipment

Once you have the ladders, PPE, guard rails or access towers, you shouldn’t simply assume the risk has been negated. The equipment may move, degrade or break over time. Make sure you have someone trained to inspect the gear and that this is done on a regular basis.

By following the steps above, you’re helping to ensure that you are working within the law and prioritising the safety of employees.

This article was written by The Hireman, a tool hire and safety training company based in London.
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Chinese contractor starts first Liverpool major project

November 9th, 2018 No comments

Chinese builder Beijing Construction & Engineering Group International has started work on a 34-storey build-to-rent project for developer Moda on the Liverpool Waterfront.

The Princes Dock tower, designed by Falconer Chester Hall architects, has been called the Lexington because its echoes New York-style designs.

Until now the Chinese state-owned builder has mainly worked in Manchester but is expanding in Liverpool.

Having entered the UK in 2013, BCEGI is an equity and construction partner on Manchester’s £1bn Airport City and preferred contractor on Middlewood Locks, the £1bn mixed-use development in Salford, which will provide 2,215 homes alongside 900,000 sq. ft. of commercial space and a new hotel.

Bachy Soletanche has started work on the historic waterfront site carrying out piling work.

Once completed in 2021, The Lexington will offer 325 flats for rent, with communal facilities including a 17th-floor residents’ lounge, gym, a roof, terrace, a garden and a cinema.

Tony Brooks, managing director at Moda, said: “With Angel Gardens in Manchester on track to complete next year, we’re delighted to have appointed BCEGI to deliver The Lexington.

“Our ambition is to create a true landmark that will add to the already world-famous Liverpool waterfront. BCEGI has a proven track record of successfully delivering some of the North West’s biggest schemes, and we’re delighted to have them on board.”

Yu Dongwen, lead director at BCEGI, said: “We are extremely proud to be appointed by MODA to deliver The Lexington. It is a flagship development that will significantly contribute to the huge transformation of  Liverpool Waters. We are looking forward to building our first project in Liverpool.”

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