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Archive for August, 2019

Recycled plastic offers pioneering protection

August 30th, 2019 No comments

One of the UK’s leading utility protection manufacturers has launched a pioneering solution to put damage prevention projects on the fast-track.

Developed and manufactured by Centriforce, the all-new Stokbord® Drum is set to transform the installation process of Stokbord Cover across the sector, providing a faster and safer solution.

Under the new initiative, Stokbord Cover can now be supplied on a reel, enabling the product to be rolled across a large area with minimal intervention, instead of laying individual one metre Covers.

Offering first-class safety and efficiency benefits, Stokbord Cover is renowned across the industry for its ability to deliver heavy duty protection for buried utilities, including gas, water, electricity and telecoms.

It also gives a clear visual warning of the presence of underground pipes and cables.

Jonathan Pearce, Head of Sales at Centriforce, said: “Working collaboratively with our customers, we recognised that the amount of time spent in the trench was a rising concern. 

“As a result, the new Stokbord Drum system has been created to deliver a mechanical rather than manual installation, keeping operatives safer and at the same time significantly speeding up the process.

“It reduces the manual labour involved and creates a lower risk environment as operatives spend less time in the trench.”

As well as supporting safety on site, Stokbord Drum also delivers a sustainable solution as it is manufactured from recycled polyethylene waste.

Confidence is further assured with the product tested against a vigorous in-house programme, to ensure Stokbord Cover complies and conforms to internationally recognised standards, such as ENA TS 12-23 and EN 12613.

Centriforce, established over 40 years ago, is based in Liverpool and is at the forefront of plastics recycling in the UK.

Trusted by civil engineering and utility companies world-wide, the company designs and manufactures damage prevention products and services to protect, locate and detect assets.

www.centriforce.com

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Whaley Bridge dam: UK manufacturing helps to save the day

August 30th, 2019 No comments

Less than 24 hours after an emergency order to supply materials to the Toddbrook Reservoir was placed, more than 8,600 bags of Saint-Gobain Weber technical mortar products were on site to help secure the dam.  

The small town of Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire made headlines at the beginning of August when part of the Toddbrook Reservoir dam structure was damaged. The emergency services were clear in their warnings: there was a major risk that an estimated 1.3 million tonnes of water could suddenly overwhelm the town, putting lives at risk and destroying property and livelihoods. Some 1,500 people were evacuated from their homes.  

On Friday 2 August, EPMS Supplies, a national distributor of construction products, contacted Saint-Gobain Weber to place an order for materials that would help temporarily repair the Toddbrook Reservoir.   

“We received a call late afternoon to ask if we could supply in excess of 200 tonnes of Weber Precision Grout or Repair Concrete to the site the following day,” said Mohammed Aljan, head of infrastructure at Saint-Gobain Weber.  

“From a logistical point of view, it was obviously a challenge. As we manufacture in the UK on a large scale, we were ready to deliver to site very quickly. There were 200 tonnes of Weber Precision Grout delivered from our manufacturing plant in Flitwick and an additional 50 tonnes already at EPMS Supplies depots.”  

Nine lorries were required to transport all the materials from Flitwick in Bedfordshire to Whaley Bridge. By the end of Friday 8,640 bags of Weber Precision Grout were prepped ready to leave site. 

Stewart Nicholas, operations director at Saint-Gobain Weber, co-ordinated the internal process of getting the product out to the dam on Saturday morning. 

“Obviously because of the time sensitive nature of the incident, we needed to pull out all the stops to get the materials to site as soon as possible. In total we had 11 members of staff helping, including two members of staff who came from our Telford plant to help load the lorries at 6:30 on Saturday morning. Thanks to Simmonds Transport, all of the materials reached the dam just a few hours later.”   

Once on site, the products were applied to the dam over a period in excess of 24 hours. Weber’s Precision Grouts and Repair Concrete has been used for over 30 years in civil infrastructure projects and are known for their strength, durability, ease of installation and non-shrink properties.  

www.uk.weber  

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Housebuilders to benefit from new trussed rafter buyers’ guide

August 30th, 2019 No comments

Housebuilders will benefit from a new guide that tells them all they need to know about trussed rafters, from delivery to site through to safe installation.

Published by the Trussed Rafter Association (TRA), ‘The Buyers’ Guide to Trussed Rafters’ is relevant to both designers and onsite trades.

It is a timely publication with the industry focusing on Modern Methods of Construction (MMC). Trussed rafters can play a significant role in making housebuilding more efficient as they offer a much faster and easier method of completing roofs.

Nick Boulton, TRA chief executive, said:

“The buyers’ guide is there to aid our members when it comes to explaining all theintricacies of trussed rafters. There is a lot to take onboard as they are a versatile product with many options. With the focus on MMC, trusses are the ideal candidate for forward-thinking roofing companies, due to their flexibility and speed of installation on site.”

“We take our collaboration with the designers and installers of our member’s products very seriously and are committed to offering guidance to increase quality and accuracy wherever possible. We hope this guide will help members to reach out to a wider audience and keep trussed rafters as the go to roofing product.”

The guide outlines the difference in responsibilities between building designers and trussed rafter designers. Explaining the various roofscapes and room in the roof layouts which can be achieved as well as providing wind loading information for both Ireland and the UK.

Throughout the guide there are technical drawings and 3D renders showing safe and compliant trusses at various stages of the design and installation process.

Once on site, the guide provides useful tips on how to safely store the trusses and how to correctly brace them. An essential construction checklist is provided to assist contractors and site staff responsible for installation. Information to assist with site certification for Ireland can also be found in the guide.

For further information or to get a copy of the guide please visit the TRA website.

www.tra.org.uk   

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Bathroom brand targeted for global growth as Jaquar plans London launch

August 29th, 2019 No comments

Bathroom brand targeted for global growth as Jaquar plans London launch

  • Jaquar’s London launch will take place on 11th, 12th and 13th September
  • The expansion into the UK is part of the group’s plans for global growth
  • Attendees can meet the people behind Jaquar’s award-winning designs

The premium bathroom company will unveil new designs at the event and attendees will have the chance to meet with the designers.

The Jaquar Group, established in 1960, caters to premium and luxury bathroom segments with Jaquar and Artize brands respectively, for residential and commercial sectors across the globe as a one-stop destination for all bathroom products.

Future plans to be outlined at Fulham launch

The London launch is the brainchild of Jaquar’s founder and chairman Rajesh Mehra, who has chosen the UK’s capital as the springboard for the next step in the company’s future. During the launch across three days in September, Mehra will be outlining what comes next for Jaquar – including plans to achieve a global income of $1bn in the next three years.

Award-winning designs to be showcased

New designs will be launched during the event, including the coordinated Arc collection; a complete range of taps, ceramics, baths and shower mixers. Also to be showcased for the first time is the Italian designed Jaquar J8 range of shower enclosures and wet rooms. Each of the ranges dovetails with Jaquar’s premium products and its uber luxury brand, Artize.

Free tickets and amazing prizes up for grabs

Attendance for this event is limited, so it’s advised that you book your tickets as soon as possible. Across the three days, attendees will have the chance to meet the business’s designers Claudia Danelon and Federico Meroni – and discover their new designs – as well as the opportunity to win tickets to Premiership football matches, The Six Nations Rugby tournament and iconic West End shows.

FREE tickets available here >

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Bringing About Boundary Dispute Reform

August 29th, 2019 No comments

Let’s use the legislative vacuum to good effect

Richard Crow, Associate Director, Trident Building Consultancy

Who would have thought that Brexit – or the lack of it – would significantly affect the way in which the industry manages boundary disputes?

Two years ago, a Private Members’ Bill sponsored by Lord Lytton received its first reading in the House of Lords. The Bill suggested that boundary issues could be better addressed by using a structure which broadly replicated the provisions of the Party Wall Act – essentially removing much of the responsibility from solicitors and handing it to surveyors. Progress of the Bill was thwarted by the general election of June 2017 and with parliamentary time apparently unavailable to advance the legislation, it is yet to have its second reading in the House of Lords. The delay is frustrating, but is also provides some necessary reflection time.

Breaking boundaries

There is undoubtedly a need to reform legislation which, as the local newspapers tell us, can cost individuals as much as £20,000 for trimming a hedge – as well as costing them their relationship with their neighbours. And as large scale development is rushed into existence to address the housing crisis, landowners will increasingly seek boundary dispute services to maximise their landholding prior to development.

The objective of the Property Boundaries (Resolution of Disputes) Bill is to replace the thousands of court and tribunal hearings which take place each year with expert surveying guidance.

Lord Lytton’s Bill aims to reduce costs and expedite the resolution of property boundary disputes. Its mandatory dispute resolution scheme involves one neighbour serving a formal notice on the other, along with a plan indicating where they believe the boundary lies. If the neighbour disagrees, then a dispute is deemed to have arisen. Either a surveyor is instructed jointly (which is encouraged to both limit costs and bring about openness), or individual surveyors are appointed by each party and a third independent surveyor instructed to make the final decision. Surveyors must be members of either RIBA, RICS or ICE and must adhere to the RICS code of conduct, regulations and RICS Professional Guidance regarding measured surveys of land, buildings and utilities and most importantly for surveyors acting on boundary disputes, boundaries,. The surveyors’ findings are regarded as conclusive unless an appeal is made to the High Court within 28 days. When this period expires without appeal, both parties must inform the Land Registry.

As a surveyor, I would be expected to support legislation but I have some reservations.

Legislation reservations

There are notable omissions. Not all boundary disputes are captured by the Bill, specifically leasehold land. This means that two adjoining leaseholders cannot determine a boundary dispute without the authority and approval of the freeholder(s). This may not appear to be an issue at first sight; however, during my career I have encountered numerous long leasehold commercial tenancies. The freeholders may have no interest with such boundary issues or may no longer be contactable as contact details have changed over the passage of time. If the tenant’s occupational use of the land is infringed due to encroachment (for example), who would the leaseholder turn to if they could not self-manage this process?  .

Furthermore, the Bill does not appear to authorise the surveyor to instruct a landowner to either remove a structure on a neighbour’s land or award compensation – this would require strict, prescriptive guidance set out, reviewed and approved by legal professionals, if the surveyor was to be granted such powers. As a consequence, there is an increased likelihood of aggrieved parties using the appeal route of the High Court – ironically adding an extra layer to the process and ultimately more legal costs.

The Bill imposes criminal sanctions on those who prevent the service of the boundary dispute notices but there is no reference to property owners who prevent surveyors from inspecting the property.

And we need more clarification on how the new procedures would work with existing rules and procedures on adverse possession or the acquisition of rights of way through the Land Registry.

Finally, due to the current system, there are very few surveyors with expertise in this area. When I undertook the inaugural RICS Expert Witness Accreditation Scheme (EWAS) certification recently, I was one of just three who, though this process, attained the recognition as an RICS Registered Expert Witness. Perhaps the lack of those suitably qualified reflects the fact that there are currently no minimum standards for boundary dispute advisors. But when this new legislation comes into effect, we would require substantially more qualified experts – ideally those who combine the experience of land surveying and a building surveying, as I do. Determining a boundary goes beyond considering topographical features and plans: the legal construction of documents, estoppel and boundary agreements and the issues of adverse possession relies on us being able to fully comprehend the legal implications of historic conveyances. If the conveyance is available, it must be interpreted – is it the clause, plan, both or neither which determines the land conveyed? – and if it is not, extrinsic evidence must be selected and appropriate weight attached.

And although the Bill aims to avoid adversarial adjudication, it requires a decision to be forced on both parties. This responsibility is placed on surveyors rather than a judge – so experience in weighing up evidence and presenting a persuasive conclusion is required. The proposed system, at present, does not allow for the parties to mediate should they wish to do so. This can be criticised as undemocratic, with the potential to set a dangerous precedent.

Light at the end of the tunnel?

Of course there are benefits in reducing solicitors’ involvement. The adversarial nature of litigation and the accruing liability – not to mention the substantial court costs – can be socially and emotionally harmful. This is well reflected in the comments of a presiding judge: “A party can litigate over a tiny strip of land, although I would certainly agree that it is usually economic madness to do so”.

Boundary disputes are a messy business – and so it would seem, is boundary dispute legislation. I am fully in support of change and welcome Lord Lytton’s initiative but clearly it requires further consideration before – hopefully – the Brexit cloud lifts one way or another and necessary legislation such as this is once again visible on the horizon.

www.tridentbc.com

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The UK’s air quality and emissions: are we making any inroads?

August 28th, 2019 No comments

It’s clear that the present threat of climate change cannot be ignored anymore. To do so would be inherently damaging — not only to the individual, but to society, to mankind, and to the entirety of life on Earth.

As dramatic as it sounds, the stark fact is that it is extremely worrying. The impact of climate change upon the planet will be nothing short of colossal-scale dramatics, for every living creature here. Even Bill Nye, who holds a place in the hearts of Americans akin to how British people embrace Sir David Attenborough, isn’t sugar coating it.

“By the end of this century, if emissions keep rising, the average temperature of the Earth could go up another four to eight degrees,” Bill Nye said on Last Week Tonight.

Meanwhile, Sir David Attenborough’s appearance on Climate Change — The Facts allowed him to deliver the difficult truth in a raw and uncompromisingly clear message: that global warming is the greatest threat the planet has witnessed in thousands of years.

It’s terrifying, but for the moment, it isn’t irreversible. The world’s governments have, by and large, agreed to cleaning up their emissions and waste in recent years. We’re recycling more and looking at renewable sources of energy. We’re removing single-use plastics from our supply chain and swapping our energy-inefficient appliances for more eco-friendly options, such as a gas combi boiler and energy-saving bulbs.

The question is whether or not we’re seeing an improvement at all from our current efforts. One way to gauge improvements is via the air quality statistics report released by the Department of Environment, Food, and Rural affairs (DEFRA).

What effects the UK’s air quality?

Before we look at the specific elements that are monitored for air quality purposes, it is important to understand what has an effect on the UK’s air quality. We all know pollutants from vehicles and fossil fuels are a prime contributor to dangerous emissions and poor air quality, but other factors can also affect our air quality, such as:

  • Emissions from Europe and the wider world
  • Weather conditions, such as heat in the summer, can cause changes in air quality

A breakdown of what’s in the air

PM10

What is PM10?

PM stands for particulate matter. These particles could be solid or liquid, come from natural or human sources, and can be a variety of sizes. Particulate matter concentration in the air is measured in micrograms per cubic metre (µg m–3). Particulate matter itself is measured in diameter from as small as a nanometre (nm), such as viruses, to micrometres (µm), such as human hair (100 µm).

PM10 covers particulate matter in the air that is less than or equal to 10 µm in diameter. Some examples of particulate matter of this size range include:

  • Dust (<10 µm)
  • Pollen (<10 µm)
  • Red blood cells (7-8 µm approx.)

Particulate matter in the air is grouped in two ways: primary components, which are released into the air from a source directly (such as pollen from a plant), and secondary components, which are created by chemical reactions in the atmosphere, (such as sulphate, which forms when sulphur dioxide oxidises in the air to create sulphuric acid, which then reacts to ammonia to create ammonium sulphate in the air).

Why is PM10 bad?

Generally speaking, small particulates in the air are considered to be harmful to human health. There is evidence to suggest particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 µm or less is particularly harmful; carbon and trace metals in the air, for example. These particulates have been linked to respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses.

Is it decreasing in the UK?

According to DEFRA, the levels of urban background PM10 pollution has reduced considerably between 1992 and 2018. The most dramatic fall was between 1992 and 2000, with an average yearly reduction of around 1.6 ?g/m3. However, the increase in PM10 between 2017 and 2018 has been noted as “statistically insignificant” by the report.

PM2.5

What is PM2.5?

Like PM10, PM2.5 refers to particular matter polluting the air around us. It is measured the same way and covers particulates with a diameter of 2.5 µm or less. Basically, these are some of the smallest particulates in the air that the country monitors. Like PM10, PM2.5 can come from manmade or natural sources and can be primary components released directly from the source to the air, or secondary components formed from a chemical reaction within the air.

Some examples of these tiny particulates are:

  • Combustion particles (<2.5 µm)
  • Nanotube electrodes (1 µm)
  • Trace metals (<2.5 µm)

Why is PM2.5 bad?

Similarly, to PM10, PM2.5 is bad news for respiration. These tiny particles can cause, as well as aggravate, respiratory diseases, cause plaque deposits in the arteries, and even lead to heart attacks or strokes. PM2.5 tend to stay in the air much longer than PM10 due to being lighter, which means people have a greater chance of inhaling them. Plus, as they are so small, the nose and lungs are not always able to filter them before they reach our lungs. The elderly and children are particularly vulnerable to this.

Is it decreasing in the UK?

PM2.5 has decreased for urban background pollution compared to 2009, with the average yearly concentration of 9.5 ?g/m3 in 2017 the lowest in the recorded range. As with PM10, the increase between 2017 and 2018 is seen as “statistically insignificant”.

NO2

What is N02?

NO2 is nitrogen dioxide, and it is measured in the air in micrograms (µg). It is produced by burning fossil fuels, such as coal, as a primary component released directly into the air. It can also be produced as a secondary component when nitrogen oxide and ozone react in the air, producing nitrogen dioxide and oxygen.

Why is NO2 bad?

DEFRA notes that NO2 can inflame the lungs, damage how our lungs work, and aggravate the symptoms of asthma. NO2 also has an adverse effect on crops and vegetation.

Is it decreasing in the UK?

NO2 levels have indeed reduced in the long term (since 1990) as well as in recent years within the UK. In particular, there was a rapid decrease in the amount of NO2 in the air between 1992 and 2002, with an average yearly reduction of around 2.7 ?g/m3.

O3

What is O3?

O3 is ozone, and like NO2, it is measured in ?g. No doubt we’ve all heard about the ozone — it protects the Earth from ultraviolet rays from the sun, and it is being destroyed by manmade emissions. Ozone is a good thing, we’re all told.

Well, yes and no. As AirNow explains, when it comes to ozone, it is “good up high, bad nearby”. Essentially, when ozone is high up in the planet’s stratosphere, it’s good. It’s protecting us, and we’re also not breathing it in at this level. But at ground level, (the troposphere), ozone is bad news for people and plants alike.

Why is O3 bad?

O3 created at ground level is usually created by chemical reactions between nitrogen and volatile organic compounds, which in turn, come from industrial emissions, vehicles, and solvents. It is particularly prominent in the summer months, as these chemical reactions occur under the heat of the sun.

Breathing in high concentrations of O3 at ground level can cause:

  • Throat irritation
  • Lung irritation and coughing
  • Chest pains
  • Reduced lung function
  • Inflammation of the lungs

It also damaged crops and makes plants more susceptible to diseases and pests.

Is it decreasing in the UK?

No — the levels of urban background ozone pollution have been increasing over the long-term, though DEFRA notes that the last decade has been “stable”. Between 2017 and 2018, the concentration of O3 increased from 58.3 ?g/m3 to 62.8 ?g/m3. There are a few reasons why this increase may have occurred:

  • Hot weather conditions create high ozone concentrations, and so, the heatwaves experienced in the UK in 2018, 2006, and 2003 – will have caused notable increases in O3.
  • The UK and Europe have reduced their nitrogen oxide emissions as a whole. Nitrogen oxide is known to reduce ozone formation. This is something of a double-edged sword: we have reduced nitrogen oxide emissions, which has in turn reduced nitrogen dioxide pollution in the air (which is formed from nitrogen oxide and ozone reacting in the air, producing nitrogen dioxide and oxygen). But in doing so, the ozone in the air has nothing to react to, meaning it stays!

When it comes to emissions and air quality, the UK is certainly seeing improvements in most areas. We still have a lot of work to do, particularly with our O3 levels. We also need to take drastic action in other climate change-causing behaviours, such as waste and recycling.

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A guide for construction firms: preventing downtime and the loss of revenue

August 28th, 2019 No comments

Generating over £100 billion per year, the construction industry is critical to the UK’s economy. And thanks to innovative new technologies, opportunities to digitally transform and streamline operations are benefitting the sector.

But with opportunity comes risk. As construction firms adopt these new technologies and devices, they’re increasing their cyber-attack surface. And if an attack is successful, the downtime could spell financial disaster for your organisation. Ransomware, for example, impacted 38% of construction organisations in 2018 (Datto).

Downtime as the result of a cyber-attack or IT failure has the potential to wreak havoc on your productivity and even render your machines and equipment inoperable. And you probably don’t need us to tell you that this equates to a lot of lost revenue.

Hackers are targeting all sectors with ransomware, which locks down your data and renders it inaccessible. With no access to your data, you may be unable to contact or pay your contractors, retrieve information about the progress of your projects or carry out any of your day-to-day obligations.

How can you take advantage of new technologies whilst keeping your business data safe and your operations online?

Deploy specific anti-malware protection

Construction organisations are a target for ransomware because any kind of downtime spells significant financial loss; hackers use this to their advantage to extort ransom payments out of you. It’s never advisable to pay the cybercriminals, as it’s rare you’ll get your data back. Additionally, hackers will identify your business as a guaranteed pay-out and will continue to target you.

Because of the exponential rise in ransomware attacks, specific solutions now exist to protect your business against this ever-growing threat. Intelligent solutions like Intercept X will prevent ransomware at the point of infiltration. Or, if your business has already fallen victim to this file-encrypting malware, it’ll reverse the damage. You’ll also get access to features like root cause analysis, which identifies how the ransomware got into your business so you can bolster your systems going forward.

Implement a robust disaster recovery solution

One downed system or server can spell disaster for your operations, and hackers know this. For years, organisations have been backing up their files and data either on physical devices or into the cloud. But now it’s not enough to simply back up data.

Unique disaster recovery solutions like Datto go a step further by backing up your entire infrastructure, whether that’s physical, virtual or in the cloud. Say, for example, a key server in your business goes down – that could be due to a malicious attack, an electrical failure or a flood. You can use your business continuity solution to spin up your server virtually and be back up-and-running in no time. A London based managed IT services provider can help you implement the most suitable solution.

Educate your employees

Your staff is your biggest attack surface. Email is by far the most popular vector to launch a cyber-attack, with an estimated 91% of cyber-attacks starting with an email designed to harvest login credentials (PhishMe research).

Today’s phishing emails are a far cry from the scam emails of old, which promise you a portion of someone’s vast fortune simply by replying to the email. Hackers are impersonating the business software you use (including purporting to be Microsoft to get your email credentials), your suppliers and even your colleagues, and they’re more convincing than ever.

Having a formal education process in place helps you to reduce the risk posed by your workforce; additionally, you can use tools which simulate phishing attacks to benchmark the existing knowledge amongst your employees and track progress against your training.

Avoiding downtime is an ongoing process

Few businesses will feel the financial impact of downtime as much as construction firms. With strict project deadlines to adhere to, an inoperable business inevitably means project delays, which results in high costs and a loss of trust.

By prioritising IT security, you can ensure your business remains operational and effective and, in turn, maximise your profitability.

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Short of time for learning and networking? Here’s seven ways to sway busy construction professionals

August 27th, 2019 No comments

We all know we need to get out more. How else will we meet new people, learn new things, find new ideas and discover new products? Yet the pressure on our time is unrelenting. It can be difficult to justify time out of the office with all those deadlines looming and emails piling up.


The internet provides part of the answer, of course. But the smartest solution for busy construction professionals is also about choosing days out that can be crammed with as much value as possible. By taking advantage of UK Construction Week (UKCW) you can tick off all the above at one event.


If you’re not yet registered to attend the UK’s largest construction event, here are seven things that ought to convince you to pop over to the NEC on 8-10 October.

  1. Products, products everywhere

New products are always being developed to meet different and emerging needs. Staying up to date with all the latest technology is essential to find the right product for the job. So, if you need to source a new heat pump, find a new sustainable material, discover new roofing products or even new BIM software, then look no further than UKCW. With over 10,000 products being showcased at the event, it makes it the ideal marketplace to source your new product. With eight different sections ranging from build to timber and from surfaces to civils everything you need is right there under one roof.

  • That lucky encounter

Year after year, visitors at UK Construction Week say they won new work as a result of a planned meeting or a chance encounter at the show. People do business with people – and with 35,000 visitors set to attend UKCW, that is a lot of potential leads. Meeting face to face is the most engaging way to do business and UKCW can facilitate that. If you have spotted a business that you want to connect with contact them through the exhibitors’ portal and arrange the meeting in advance. 4,000 business meetings were booked by UKCW visitors prior to the show last year, and exhibitors reported that they had generated 70,000 new business leads at the event. To help with meetings, there’s a new business and networking lounge with free WIFI.


3. Genuine innovation, not another widget

You could leave the future of the industry as a surprise. But where’s the business sense in that? Disruptors are now present in many different markets, so this year UKCW is shining a spotlight on the serious change-makers in construction. To aid the search, a new Innovation Zone has been established in partnership with the Construction Innovation Hub (the Hub).

Another new addition for this year is the Innovation Station in partnership with On the Tools. This is a demonstration area specifically for power tools, with all the latest biscuit jointers and heavy-duty bench grinders from top trade brands in action. Visitors can pick up tips from the experts on how to get the most from their range, try out the latest products, and cut a deal with the manufacturers as show discounts will apply. 


4. Your own personal industry MBA

Condense your strategic business learning into one, two or three days of insights. UKCW brings together more than 300 expert speakers including Mark Farmer who is spearheading policy initiatives on MMC, Professor Birgitte Andersen of the Big Innovation Centre, Chandru Dissanayeke, director of building safety reforms at MHCLG, Keith Waller, programme director at the Construction Innovation Hub, Sarah Beale, chief executive of CITB and Sonia Zahiroddiny, BIM Strategy Manager for HS2. The UKCW main stage is the place to head to. It offers a programme of keynote talks and panel discussions on many of the big issues of the day around Government policy, digital innovation, MMC, sustainability, diversity, housebuilding, productivity and skills.

And if that’s all a bit too high level, get stuck into the details at a wide range of workshops. This year there will be more than 150 hours of CPD content available. The programme will take on a different theme for each day of the show, tackling fire safety, health and wellbeing and sustainability. There are mini-theatres covering regeneration, MMC, digital construction, energy and HVAC, surfaces and materials, timber and the workplace. There’s a new Careers Centre offering workshops on career progression, apprenticeships, staff retention, diversity, career change and new talent.

5. A bit of myth busting on MMC

Everyone knows that Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) are back in vogue, but what is the reality this time? MMC is a strong theme at this year’s UKCW. Full-scale builds will be erected onsite with live demos of MMC technology in action. Head to the MMC Hub for other digital demos and simulations too. Examples of the pre-manufactured structures at the show range from a modular care annex for the healthcare sector and a SIPS panel residential building, to a factory-finished modular bathroom pod for the high end hotel sector, and offsite solutions for the education sector.


6. An experience not easily forgotten

To really understand another person, as the saying goes, you need to walk a mile in their shoes. So, when did you last get to run a building site? Make a beeline for the Coventry University stand and its site simulator. It’s hailed as one of the most powerful experiences of any construction show. If you’re feeling brave you can step into the site hut, take on the role of the site manager and get first-hand experience of what it’s like to work on a busy project. Not for the faint hearted!

7. Celebrations and a beer festival

Everyone enjoys a good awards night and UKCW is no exception. The show hosts the UKCW Role Model of the year, the new Building Trades Awards with Fix Radio and the new UKCW Construction Awards. Plus, to encourage young people into construction the iBuiltThis competition is back and the winners will be announced at UKCW.

And if you’re not involved in the celebrations, just unwind each day with a beer, some street food and a spot of music. The Fischer bar is in Hall 11 and the Rawlplug bar is in Hall 12. Don’t forget the Beer Festival, sponsored by NBS and of course the ‘Rockaoke’ on Wednesday night.

UKCW is one event with many sections, including Build, sponsored by Easy-Trim, Building Tech, Civils, Energy and HVAC, Surface and Materials, and Timber. It also features Concrete Expo (8-9 October only) and Grand Designs Live (9-10 October only).

Single registration gives access to all areas of the show. For further information visit:  https://www.ukconstructionweek.com/.

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Dream Garages Crafted In Oak

August 27th, 2019 No comments

Dream Garages Crafted In Oak 

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TIMco ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH LOCAL WILDLIFE ORGANISATION

August 23rd, 2019 Comments off

TIMco, one of the UK’s largest, independent and fastest growing wholesalers to the construction industry, is supporting its local community by partnering with Bees In Our Community – a bee conservation organisation based in Northwich and operating throughout Cheshire. The partnership is part of the company’s strategy to build a sustainable business and support the communities in which it trades.

Bees In Our Community was set up in 2016 as a not-for-profit social enterprise to offer a free ongoing ‘loan’ of beehives and honeybees to home owners, land owners and farmers with many hives being located close to TIMco’s Headquarters and Warehouse in Nantwich, Cheshire.

The aim is to get to 300+ hives into the local community. The bees are all locally bred and raised and are of the native (Apis Mellifera Mellifera) strain. The native bees make best use of the variable weather and forage that Cheshire experiences and play a vital role in pollination, with an estimated one third of all foods consumed each day relying on pollination by bees.

The hives are too expensive to buy new so they are hand made from locally sourced and recycled wood which requires a large volume of screws and glue in their assembly.  To support the charity’s endeavours, TIMco has initially donated over 25,000 items of their screw stock (as per Bees In Our Community requirements) to the cause, as well as suppling wood for the construction of the hives. TIMco is looking to pledge further donations to the organisation throughout the coming year.

TIMco has committed to supply the charity with all their fixing needs to achieve their targets. They have also contributed to the re-design of the hives so that they can be made from timber originally used in pallets. This mutually beneficial opportunity has reduced the amount of timber being recycled and reduced the material cost to zero.

Simon Midwood, Managing Director of TIMco, comments: “We are excited to be supporting local initiatives such as Bees in Our Community and to be helping them with such a positive initiative. As a ‘Founding Sponsor’, we look forward to continuing to support the organisation’s outstanding work and to help make a positive environmental impact within our local community. In the future, we hope to have some hives on TIMco’s land in order to bring our support for this cause to life.”

Karl Colyer of Bees In Our Community was delighted with the support given by TIMco: “As a not-for-profit business, every penny counts and is directed towards helping honeybees. The very generous supply of screws and several van loads of wood has really helped us provide quality hives for the bees.”

This timely support follows hot on the heels of the city of Chester’s aim to become the most bee-friendly city in the country by running a #BEEfriendlyChester campaign to educate and encouraging Chester to ‘bee-friendly’. The Grosvenor Shopping Centre will be hosting events from July 27 to September 1, including live hive workshops, scuttlebee kids play zone, fun activities, bee flower seed giveaways, local honey sellers and education demonstrations.

Further information regarding the work carried out by Bees In Our Community can be found on their website at www.beesinourcommunity.org.uk   

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